Lifestyle Transformation Design

Mono-eating

Aimée Jiline Selling
Practice Commercial Practices
Project New Frontiers
Major Lifestyle Transformation Design
Year Graduation project

Mono-eating focuses on unconscious eating behaviour in a fast and multitasking society.

Mono-eating

How can design make people eat more consciously in a time when most people are often distracted and in a rush? Mono-eating focuses on unconscious eating behaviour in a fast and multitasking society.
Behavior designer Aimée Selling researches the daily behaviour of people and tries to influence this behavior in a positive way. During her research on the eating behaviour of people, she noticed that most people consume in an unconscious way - without any focus on the food and its taste.

Concept & design : Aimée Jiline
Video & photography: Suzette Silvy
Sound video: Noa Silver

An incredible 95% of our total behaviour is automatic behaviour, which develops itself through repeating certain actions. According to scientific research it takes only 21 days before you develop a habit and 26 days before it becomes an automatic behaviour. Because of the high percentage of automatic behaviour, we are able to do multiple tasks at the same time, which leads to multitasking. Although multitasking is only the fast switching between tasks instead of doing them simultaneously, it may not be as efficient as we all think it is. Since our brain remains slightly focused on the previous task while we are doing the next task, it can develop some delay(s). This delay in the brain can result to damage to the structure of the brain.

In addition, the behaviour of multitasking can prevent the brain from being able to deeply and fully concentrate. Besides the previous disadvantages, multitasking also influences our eating behaviour. By other tasks while eating, we don’t “perceive” the taste of our food as well as we would without multitasking. This leads to the desire of wanting to eat with heavier flavour (salt and sugar) as a result and make us eat more than what our body actually needs.

A novel, intriguing and slow paced eating experience

With the project Mono-eating Aimée creates a novel, intriguing and slow paced eating experience by using flexible materials as the eating tools. By eating with these tools, it ensures you to only concentrate on the act of eating and not be distracted by other things. By creating more consciousness and concentration during eating, Aimée develops a new eating ritual in which being conscious and mono-tasking becomes the main theme.

Photography: Suzette Silvy
Photography: Suzette Silvy

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